DIY – Homemade Rose Water

Rosewater is a versatile fragrance that has been used throughout the ages and across cultures. Rosewater was a popular flavoring in baking before vanilla came into use in Europe and America. It is used widely still to flavor sweets in Iranian cuisine.

It can be used as a moisturizer for dry hair as well as dry skin. It is commonly put to use as a sweet body perfume or tossed with dry rose petals as a subtle fragrance in your home.

There are a lot of methods on the internet for making your own rose water. Some are a bit more complex and will leave you with beautiful clear rose water as well as rose oil. While others are more suited to the beginner, just be ready to experiment with a few extra rose petals lying around.

I have some friends whose beautiful roses are exploding with blooms right now. So, with lots of petals at hand I used this very simple method for trying my hand at making my own batch of rose water.

You will need a double boiler. Fill the top with rose petals. (Be sure they are freshly washed and dried. You will also want to be sure that they are chemical free.) Fill the bottom pot with water. Cover and bring to a simmer. When petals have lost their color remove from heat and squeeze any remaining water out of the petals. Allow water to cool and bottle as desired. Your rose water should stay good for up to 1 month.

Here is an update from Emily to clarify, in answer to some questions:

“I used the steamer top of my double boiler pans and totally failed to mention that very important piece of information. I see the confusion now!!

You can also use a regular double boiler, but yes, you would add water to the top where the rose petals are. Either method should work beautifully.”

How do you use rose water in your home or beauty routine?

If you make your own, please share your tips in the comments!

Michele’s note: I love to use Rose Water as a facial toner or “perfume,” as well as in my Rhubarb-Rose Jam!

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28 comments to DIY – Homemade Rose Water

  • Hi :)
    Tanks for the tip :)
    /silverglans
    Wwww.metrobloggen.se/silverglans

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  • I use rose water as a toner. It tightens pores and balances and restores pH levels in the skin. I’ve never made my own, but this looks like a super easy method. Thanks for sharing!

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  • Can you use dried rose petals, or will only fresh work?

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    Michele Reply:

    @Regina Murphy, I think you need to stick with fresh rose petals, for the best oil content. :)

    Blessings,
    Michele

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  • Elizabeth

    My sister used to work in a bakery, where they made a tart from shortbread crust, with a layer of rose water caramel and a layer of chocolate ganache over that. So delicious!

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    Shannan Reply:

    Elizabeth,
    Would you be willing to share that recipe? My daughter is interested in ganache and I love shortbread. THANK YOU! =)

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  • That’s awesome, thanks so much, my roses are exploding right now! I also use the petals in salad, delicious and colorful!

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  • Shell

    Might it last longer if you used a bit of alcohol ie vodka, or witch hazel in the finished product I wonder?

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    Michele Reply:

    Absolutely! I have used witch hazel for some of my homemade toner, and it has been long-lasting. :)

    Blessings,
    Michele

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  • Zenaida Wilk

    Could I use store bought fresh roses? How could I tell if the rose petals are chemical free, and how could I get rid of the chemicals if there are on the roses? What kind of rose is the edible ones? I want to try them too and mix them in my salad. Thank you and thanks so much for sharing the rose water recipe. Zenaida

    [Reply]

    Lois Reply:

    @Zenaida Wilk, Zenaida, unless you’ve grown them yourself, or bought them from a local, trusted gardener/farmer there’s no way to tell if they’re chemical free. As far as I know, all rose petals are edible (as long as they haven’t been sprayed with toxic chemicals).

    [Reply]

    Emily Reply:

    @Zenaida Wilk,
    I would recommend speaking directly with the florist about the roses they sell. They should be able to tell you if the roses are chemical free. A farmer’s market floral vendor would also be a great resource to have a lot of your questions answered.

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  • Meg

    Please pardon my ignorance but where does the rose “water” come from if you place only petals in the top of the boiler? Thank you for sharing this recipe. I’m excited to try it!

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    Melissa Reply:

    @Meg,

    I was confused by this, too. Thanks for asking.

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    Emily Reply:

    @Meg,
    The bottom of the boiler is filled with water. As the petals are heated they will drip their moisture and oils down and infuse the water in the bottom pan. This water in the end will be your rose water. Enjoy.

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    Michele Reply:

    Now I’m confused. The water in the bottom of the boiler should not be able to mix with the rose water; it’s just used for heating. The water/oils should come only from the fresh rose petals, as far as I understand, unless you actually add water to the top pot with the petals.

    Thanks!
    Michele

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    Emily Reply:

    @Michele,

    My apologies. I used the steamer top of my double boiler pans and totally failed to mention that very important piece of information. I see the confusion now!!

    You can also use a regular double boiler, but yes you would add water to the top where the rose petals are. Either method should work beautifully.

    I am so sorry for that miscommunication!

    Michele Reply:

    Ah! That makes sense now! :) Thanks! Let’s update the post with that info. :)

    Michele

    Lois Reply:

    @Emily, Do you use a strainer for the top pot instead of a pan?

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  • Emily

    My girls and I made some cupcakes over the weekend using the following recipe involving rose water. They were very rich and dense, and very delicious. The girls enjoyed how fancy they looked!

    http://blog.modcloth.com/2012/02/09/sprinkle-bakes-guest-post-vanilla-rose-water-cupcakes/

    [Reply]

    Michele Reply:

    Oh, those look lovely! I’m sure my little girl would love them, too, once our roses bloom. She’s really in a “pink & princessy” phase right now. :)

    Thanks!
    Michele

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  • Meg

    I don’t see how the oils from the petals could mix with the water in the bottom of the boiler. I just read elsewhere that you should cover the rose petals with water. Has anyone tried the recipe either with or without the water added to the petals?

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  • […] you this month. At the end of the day, when I wash up, I like to use a bit of homemade toner (with my favorite rose water!). It removes any lingering makeup, if I wore any that day, and feels great. (Then I apply the […]

  • Angelina

    Could I add other things to the water? I did a practice batch of rose water with clementines and it smells AMAZING! Do you know how it will keep?

    Thanks- :)

    [Reply]

    Michele Reply:

    That does sound nice. If you use just the peel, it would probably last awhile. Using the pulp/juice might cause it to spoil quickly. Let us know how it goes! :)

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  • Diyah

    I used rose petal from the flower shop but I not sure whether it contain chemical.. what do u think of flower from shop? Did they spray with chemical?

    [Reply]

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